Ansible collect basic facts about host

ansible -m setup ipa3.ipa.example.com

This gets output similar to:

ipa3.ipa.example.com | SUCCESS => {
    "ansible_facts": {
        "ansible_all_ipv4_addresses": [
            "10.212.16.236"
        ],
        "ansible_all_ipv6_addresses": [],
        "ansible_apparmor": {
            "status": "disabled"
        },
        "ansible_architecture": "x86_64",
...
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Check if network port is open

On the local system, check if something is listening to the port:

netstat -tlpn

On a remote system, you can use telnet or ncat to check to see if you can actually get to the port:

echo '' | telnet myserver 1054

If successful, telnet returns ‘Connected to myserver’ before closing out.

echo '' | nc -v myserver 1054
$ echo '' | nc -v myserver 1054
Ncat: Version 6.40 ( http://nmap.org/ncat )
Ncat: Connected to 192.168.50.35:1054.
$ echo '' | nc -v myserver 1055
Ncat: Version 6.40 ( http://nmap.org/ncat )
Ncat: No route to host.

Pretty print json in python

For python2

I wanted to show what variables are in use in a function, and I wanted to see it in a nicer format than a really long, single line.

import inspect, json
def function():
print json.dumps(locals(),indent=3,separators=(',',': '))

Bonus

To view what parameters were passed in to a function, add these.

def caller_args():
   frame = inspect.currentframe()
   outer_frames = inspect.getouterframes(frame)
   caller_frame = outer_frames[1][0]
   return inspect.getargvalues(caller_frame)

def function():
print caller_args()

References

  1. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/29935276/inspect-getargvalues-throws-exception-attributeerror-tuple-object-has-no-a#29935277
  2. compact encoding https://docs.python.org/2/library/json.html

					

Get Windows license key from your hardware in Linux

If you are running on hardware that originally came with a licensed Microsoft Windows operating system, you should check to see if you can get the license key from your hardware.

sudo hexdump -s 56 -e '"MSDM key: " /29 "%s\n"' /sys/firmware/acpi/tables/MSDM
MSDM key: 12345-09876-ABCDE-FGHIJ-ZYXWV (obscured, of course)

Or another way:

sudo cat /sys/firmware/acpi/tables/MSDM | strings

I never came across this tidbit until today! Apparently it is well-known throughout the Internet.

References

Weblinks

  1. Found it first at https://solus-project.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=8663
  2. Strings method https://superuser.com/questions/637971/how-do-i-get-out-my-embedded-windows-8-key-from-a-linux-environment#638033

dconf save and load from file

dconf save and load to file

GNOME-based desktops use a settings utility that is a little similar to the registry of a famous non-free operating system. I’ll spare you the ideological diatribe and get to the task at hand. I use Cinnamon from the Linux Mint project, and it is based on GNOME 3.

The command line tool for manipulating the settings is titled dconf.

Saving dconf settings to file

Dumping its output is easy.

dconf dump /
[net/launchpad/plank/docks/dock1]
icon-size=32
show-dock-item=false
position='left'
dock-items=['org.gnome.Terminal.dockitem', 'nemo.dockitem', 'firefox.dockitem']
unhide-delay=0
items-alignment='center'

Redirect to a file and you’re done.

dconf dump / > my-cinnamon.dconf

Pick a subdirectory if you wish to narrow it down.

dconf dump /org/cinnamon/sounds/
[/]
maximize-enabled=false
unmaximize-enabled=false
tile-enabled=false
map-enabled=false
close-enabled=false
minimize-enabled=false
switch-enabled=false

Loading dconf settings from file

The reverse is also as easy.
Make sure you use the same directory in the layout.

dconf load / < my-cinnamon.dconf

The story

This post is a precursor to a discussion about manipulating the settings programmatically in xfconf-query, which is the settings cli tool for the xfce desktop environment.
I wrote a wrapper script for a project of mine. Check out dconf.sh at gitlab underneath my project bgconf.

Prepend output with time to generate each line

To show how long it takes before showing each new line of output, use this neat command.

long_command | ts -i "%.s"
$ ./configure --prefix=/tools | ts -i %.s
0.082337 checking for a BSD-compatible install... /tools/bin/install -c
0.002841 checking whether build environment is sane... yes
0.008164 checking for a thread-safe mkdir -p... /tools/bin/mkdir -p
0.000040 checking for gawk... gawk
0.005892 checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes

References

Weblinks

  1. St├ęphane Chazelas at https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/391210/prepending-each-line-with-how-long-it-took-to-generate-it/391222#391222

Restart cinnamon from command line

When cinnamon freezes up and needs to be restarted, you can restart it from Cinnamon itself or from a different terminal.

In Cinnamon

Press ALT+F2. Type in the letter r and press enter.

On the command line

To switch to another console terminal, press CTRL+ALT+F2.
On this terminal, type this command.

pkill -HUP -f "cinnamon --replace"

References

Weblinks

  1. User sim at askubuntu.com https://askubuntu.com/questions/143838/how-do-i-restart-cinnamon-from-the-tty/523436#523436